If any area in Italy is wrongfully underrated, it is Umbria. It is the tranquil heart of the country, a treasure chest where traditions have been kept alive since medieval times. The softly rolling hills are covered in green grass and golden grains, alternated by historic villages and luscious vineyards.

I do have to be honest: before this trip, I knew nearly nothing about the region. I felt so foolish for never paying attention to this peaceful oasis in Southern Europe. With this visual travel guide to Umbria, I hope more people will get to know this stunning corner of the world, including you!

A Visual Travel Guide to Umbria: 25 Photos to Inspire Your Trip

The cityscape of Assisi. a highight in this travel guide to Umbria
A cityscape view of Assisi, an important historic town in Umbria.

Monte Cucco

Monte Cucco is a special place on Earth, especially for nature lovers like me. The mesmerizing mountainous landscape is amazing to discover by foot or bicycle, and the admirable story behind the regional park makes the experience even better.

All the way back in 1289 (yes, in the Middle Ages!), long before any of the climate discussions we’re having today, 40 families decided to work together and buy the lands of Monte Cucco from a nobleman. They understood how important the mountain’s ecosystem was for humans as well. Just think about their supply of wood, water, and animals. The name of this local organisation is “Università di Uomini Originari di Costacciaro” and it still exists to this day.

On top of Monte Cucco in Umbria

A butterfly on a flower on Monte Cucco, Umbria.

A cow grazes a meadow on Monte Cucco in Umbria.

Standing on top of Monte Cucco in Umbria.

Wild strawberries on Monte Cucco, Umbria

Assisi

Assisi has been a city-sanctuary through Roman, Medieval, and present times. On every corner of the street, you will notice well-preserved ancient and medieval monuments that temporarily take you back in time. Assisi is also the birthplace of the famed Franciscan Order. This Catholic movement teaches to seek peace and live with minimal property.

To this day, pilgrims from all over the world travel to Assisi to visit the crypts of Saint Francis and Saint Clara. The town possessed such an otherworldly atmosphere that, even if you’re not religious (like me), you will fully understand why so many souls have been visiting this place for centuries.

A cityscape view of the town of Assisi in Umbria.

A view of the landscape in Umbria from Assisi.

The Basilica of Saint Francis in Assisi. Religious souvenirs in Assisi, Umbria.

Trasimeno Lake

What Umbria lacks in coastal beauty, it makes up for with Trasimeno Lake. This travel guide to Umbria would be incomplete without mentioning this natural gem. It is the fourth-largest lake in Italy and belongs to Trasimeno National Park. Time slows down along the shores of he lake, where the silent sunrises and sunsets allow the Umbrian nature to thrive.

The lake and its surroundings form one of the most precious swamps in Europe, and the area known as the Oasi Naturalistica La Valle is a true highlight in central Italy. Trust me; hikers, kitesurfers, birdwatchers, and kayakers won’t be disappointed.

The shoreline of Lake Trasimeno in Umbria Trasimeno Lake in Umbria at sunset.

Castiglione del Lago

There are many charming towns along the shores of Trasimeno Lake, but one of the prettiest is Castiglione del Lago. The views of the lake from the hilltop town are a treat for the eyes. Don’t expect a booming nightlife scene, but instead enjoy the genuine village vibes that have become hard to find. Castiglione del Lago isn’t swarming with tourists, but the welcoming locals sell quality wares that work well as authentic souvenirs (like the lovely ‘cojoni di mulo’ sausage, which translates into “donkey’s balls”).

A golden sunset in Umbria (Castiglione del Lago)

The main street in the old center Castiglione del Lago

Historic center of Castiglione del Lago in Umbria

Perugia

Perugia is the bustling capital city of Umbria, best known for her university and cosy atmosphere. It is one of the cities in Tuscany and Umbria that the Etruscans used to rule; a mysterious civilization that faded away when their offspring assimilated into Roman culture. The mixture of Etruscan, Roman, medieval and Renaissance architecture makes this city a fascinating cultural highlight in the region. Urban explorers and art lovers will feel right at home.

A busy terrace in Perugia looks out on the landscape in Umbria.

The historic center of Perugia in Umbria.

A historic street in Perugia, Umbria.

Montefalco

Last, but far from least: Montefalco is an upcoming wine region in Umbria that offers endless vistas of breathtaking vineyards and olive fields, especially during the characteristically golden sunsets. Because of these gorgeous views, the commune has earned the nickname “balcony of Umbria”, which should tell you enough. You can even go on a adventurous drive through the fields in a jeep, squeezing through the rows of grape vines.

Jumping in the air in the vineyards of Montefalco in Umbria

The Best Time to Travel to Umbria

The best period to plan a trip to Umbria would be somewhere in the late spring, late summer or early autumn. The ideal months would be April, June, September, and October. Try to avoid July and August, since this will be prime time in terms of tourism and the temperatures will be (uncomfortably) hot.

More articles from me about Italy:

I hope this travel guide to Umbria has inspired you to start planning a trip to this underestimated destination. The locals of Umbria certainly deserve more attention for their hospitality and heart-warming passion for the region. Curious about discovering other parts in Italy? Have a look at a few more of my articles!

This article was written in collaboration with UmbriaSí and IDEM Servizitalia. Thanks again for organizing this wonderful trip to Umbria!

Like
5

Let me know what you think

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.